What’s inside Issue 226: on sale March 9

Headline News

David Smith’s Bulleid Merchant Navy Pacific No. 35018 British India Line to become next main line star; Lynton & Barnstaple turn a major obstruction into profit; ‘Great Britain X’ line-up revised; Carnforth’s iconic Brief Encounter clock stops following a ‘race row’ and Bala Lake gets its first foothold in Bala.

 

News

New Saint Lady of Legend ‘unlikely to go main line’; Farewell to West Somerset’s ‘No.1’ John Pearce; Great Central ‘Black Five’ booked for big Toddington festival; Dormans opens door for Flying Scotsman’s Easter Bluebell Railway visit; Beattie well tank returns ‘home’ to South Devon Railway; North Eastern Locomotive Preservation Group and North Norfolk Railway share top Heritage Railway Association award; Bo’ness bid for £2 million steam facility; hurdles tumble as Llangollen marches into central Corwen; and go-ahead for Elsecar level crossings.

Main Line News

Festive ‘Jacobite’ trains confirmed; Settle and Carlisle ‘Plandampf’ big hit with public; tour programme blitzed by cancellations and gauging issue forces Vintage Trains reshuffle.

With Full Regulator
Don Benn reports on performances by BR Standard 5MT 4-6-0s.

It’s a guard’s life

RIGHT: Been thinking about whether to volunteer at your local preserved railway? Paul Appleton encourages you to step forward, just as he did at the Severn Valley Railway three years ago.

Why steam needs a 90mph limit

 


LEFT
: There has been considerable debate recently about raising the speed limit for main line steam to 90mph and Tornado is about to undertake some experimental runs. John Forman argues that it is time for a more realistic assessment of high speed steam performance on the main line.

Perfect for Snowdonia

Garratt articulated locomotives are the perfect choice to handle the heavy demands made on engines operating on the Welsh Highland Railway’s steep winding route through Snowdonia. Allan George outlines the history of the WHR fleet of Garratts.

Life on Mars

National Coal Board steam lingered on in the North East into the 1970s. Chris Gee reminisces about a trip to the remains of the Bowes Railway in 1971, illustrated by more recent photographs showing how the preserved section of line has changed little in the intervening years.

 

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